How to stop texting and driving

How to stop texting and driving

Texting and driving are a dangerous combination. Every day, people are killed or seriously injured in crashes caused by texting while driving. It’s estimated that 1 out of 4 car accidents in the United States is caused by texting and driving.

You are texting while driving is so dangerous because it takes your hands off the wheel, your eyes off the road, and your mind off of driving. It would help if you did better when trying to do two things simultaneously.

There are several ways to stop texting and driving. The best solution is to simply put your phone away before you get behind the wheel. If you can’t resist the urge to check your phone while driving, a few apps can help. For example, DriveSafely disables certain features on your phone while driving, and TextLimit allows you to limit how many texts you can send while you’re behind the wheel.

No matter what method you choose, committing yourself to stop texting and driving is important. It will make the roads safer for everyone.

The Dangers of Texting and Driving

Though it may seem harmless, texting and driving are one of the most dangerous things you can do on the road. People are killed or seriously injured daily because someone is texting and driving. Here are a few tips if you’re looking for a way to stop texting and driving.

Car Crashes

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the United States, and many are caused by distracted driving. Texting and driving are one of the most dangerous things you can do on the road, and it’s important to be aware of the risks before you get behind the wheel.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, more than 3,000 people were killed in car crashes involving distracted drivers in 2016. That’s an increase of 9% from the year before. And teens are particularly at risk: The NHTSA says that fatal distracted driving crashes increased by 19% for 16- to 19-year-olds from 2015 to 2016.

There are several reasons why texting and driving are so dangerous. For one thing, it takes your attention off the road. You’re looking at your phone and thinking about what you want to say or type. That means you need to pay attention to what’s happening around you, and you could easily miss something important.

Another problem is that texting and driving slow your reaction time. If someone cuts you off or there’s a sudden stop in traffic, it could take you longer to react because you’re not focused on driving. That could mean hitting the brakes too late or swerving into another lane.

Texting and driving are also dangerous because it increases your chances of getting into an accident. One study found that drivers who were texting were six times more likely to get into an accident than those who weren’t. And if you get into an accident while you’re texting, it could be more serious than if you weren’t distracted because you didn’t have time to react properly.

If you can avoid texting and driving, do it. It could save your life or someone else’s life.

Injuries

Texting and driving are not only dangerous, but it is also illegal in many states. Despite the dangers and the laws, people continue to do it. In 2016, 3,450 people were killed in crashes involving distracted driving. That’s an average of nine people killed every day.

Around 387,000 people were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers in 2015. That’s an average of 1,100 people injured every day.

Texting and driving are especially dangerous because it combines all three types of distraction: visual (taking your eyes off the road), manual (taking your hands off the wheel), and cognitive (taking your mind off of driving). Sending or reading a text takes your eyes off the road for 5 seconds. At 55 mph, that’s like driving the length of an entire football field completely blindfolded!

Distracted Driving

Texting and driving are one of the most dangerous things you can do on the road. It takes your eyes off the road, your hands off the wheel, and your mind off driving. It takes a split second for something to happen, and you could be involved in a serious accident.

In 2012, 3,328 people were killed in crashes involving distracted drivers, and 421,000 people were injured. That’s an average of nine people killed and 1,175 injured every day.

Most states have laws that ban texting while driving, but enforcement is difficult, and many drivers continue to text while behind the wheel. The best way to protect yourself and others is to commit not to texting and driving.

The Laws Against Texting and Driving

It is now illegal to text and drives in most states. You could be subject to a fine if caught texting and driving. Some states have even implemented a no-texting and driving law, which means you cannot text and drive even if you are stopped at a red light.

Federal

The federal government has taken action against texting while driving by issuing an executive order to federal employees in 2010. The order prohibits federal employees from texting while driving on government business or using government equipment. The order applies to all executive branch employees, including military employees.

In addition, the U.S. Department of Transportation has issued a ban on texting for interstate commercial bus and truck drivers. The ban is part of the department’s effort to reduce distracted driving.

State

Every state has different requirements and legislation regarding using cell phones and text messaging devices while operating a motor vehicle. Some states have enacted laws that ban all cell phone use by drivers, while others have only bans for texting or those under a certain age. Although many states have outlawed texting while driving, there is no clear law against it. If you are caught texting and driving in a state with no law against it, you may still be ticketed for careless or reckless driving.

In addition to state laws, some localities have enacted bans on texting while driving. These laws are usually stricter than state laws, so it is important to know the rules in your area. You may be subject to higher fines or penalties if caught breaking a local law.

To find out the laws in your state or locality, you can visit your state’s website or contact your local department of motor vehicles.

The Consequences of Texting and Driving

Texting and driving is a dangerous habit that is becoming all too common. People are injured or killed in accidents daily because someone was texting while driving. It is important to be aware of the consequences of this dangerous behavior to avoid it.

Fines

Texting and driving are not only illegal in many states, but they can also lead to costly fines. In some states, the penalties for texting and driving are the same as those for DUI. The consequences of texting and driving can include:

-A fine of up to $1000.

-Suspension of your driver’s license.

-Points on your driving record.

-Increased insurance rates.

In addition to the legal consequences, texting and driving can lead to accidents. In 2016, 3473 people were killed in crashes involving a distracted drivers. If you are caught texting and driving, you could be putting yourself and others at risk.

Points on Your License

Texting and driving are major problems on the roads today. Drivers who text are 23 times more likely to get into an accident than non-texting drivers. Every day, 11 teens die as a result of texting and driving. Despite these statistics, 50% of teens say they have texted while driving in the past month.

One of the consequences of texting and driving is points on your license. You will automatically get two points on your license if caught texting and driving. These points will stay on your license for two years and increase your insurance rates. If you accumulate four or more points on your license within two years, you will be required to take a driver’s safety course.

Insurance Rate Increases

Texting and driving are not only illegal in many states, but it is also extremely dangerous. If caught texting and driving, you may face several consequences, including an increase in your car insurance rates.

Most insurance companies consider texting and driving a form of distracted driving, and they will penalize you accordingly. Sometimes, your rates could increase by as much as 20%. In addition to higher rates, you may also lose certain discounts, such as your good driver discount.

If you are caught texting and driving more than once or are involved in an accident while texting and driving, you may be considered a high-risk driver. This could result in even higher insurance rates or even the cancellation of your policy.

The best way to avoid these consequences is to put your phone away behind the wheel. Pull over to a safe location if you must use your phone for something essential. Remember, no text is worth risking your life or the lives of others.

How to Stop Texting and Driving

Texting and driving are dangerous habits. People are killed or injured in accidents daily because someone is texting while driving. It’s time to put a stop to it. Here are some tips on how you can stop texting and driving.

Put Your Phone Away

The first and most important step is to put your phone away. You can’t be tempted to look at it if you can’t see it. Please put it in the glove compartment, in the trunk, or even out of reach. If you are a passenger in a car, ensure the driver puts their phone away. If you are driving, ensure all your passengers know that you are not to be interrupted except in an emergency.

Use Hands-Free Devices

Texting and driving are dangerous habits. People are killed or seriously injured in car accidents every day because someone was distracted by their phone. Even hands-free devices are not risk-free. The best way to avoid accidents is to put your phone away and focus on driving.

There are several hands-free devices available that can help you stay focused on the road. These devices use Bluetooth technology to connect your phone to your car, so you can make and receive calls without taking your hands off the wheel.

Some newer cars come with built-in hands-free systems, but aftermarket options are available if yours don’t. You can also download apps that will read text messages aloud and allow you to respond with pre-written responses.

Remember that it’s still important to pay attention to the road, no matter what hands-free option you choose. If you’re tired or distracted, pull over and rest or wait until you can completely focus on driving.

Pull Over If You Need to Text

Texting and driving are a dangerous combination. Every day in the United States, over eight people are killed and 1,161 injured in crashes that are reported to involve a driver distracted by a cell phone1. If you need to text, pull over to a safe location first.

Designate a Texter

Designate a texter before you start driving. This person will be responsible for reading and responding to any texts that come in. Pull over to a safe location if you must respond to a text.

Be a Good Role Model

Now that you know the risks of texting and driving, it’s important to set a good example for others, especially if you have teen drivers in your home. Here are a few things you can do to lead by example:

  • Put your phone out of reach: If you can’t see your phone, you can’t be tempted to answer it while driving. Please put it in the glove box, back seat, or trunk.
  • Keep your hands on the wheel: If you need to use your phone for navigation, set it up before you start driving. Then, put it where you can see it without taking your hands off the wheel.
  • Don’t make excuses: If someone calls or texts while you’re driving, let them know that you’re driving and can’t talk. You can also set up an automatic response message letting people know you’re driving and will get back to them when you arrive at your destination.
  • Be a good passenger: If you’re in a car with a texting driver, speak up! Let them know it makes you uncomfortable, and ask them to stop.